Who Gets Turkey Neck and What Are the Possible Causes?

turkey neck
Q: Who gets turkey neck? Is there any specified age where turkey neck occurs? And why? What causes turkey neck?
Expert Answer

After people get older, after the age of 30, they are more susceptible to turkey neck. Plenty of factors contribute to the normal skin aging processes. The elasticity of your skin gradually disappears while regeneration of new skin cells slows down.

Majority of people will shed of extra pound with age which makes the turkey neck more conspicuous. Turkey necks mostly affect the older people although some as young as in the 40’s or less suffer from the same condition. There is no need to panic if you have one. No one is exempt from this problem, not even the celebrities, rich or poor.

The good news is that there are several ways in dealing with the turkey neck without having to undergo surgery. Proper diet and neck exercise are among the best approaches.

Causes of Turkey Neck Include

Elasticity Loss in The Skin

Elasticity of a skin refers to its ability to return back to the original size and shape after some sort of pressure has been applied and finally removed. From the fact that if you pull your skin, it will normally bounce back to its position, that means it is elastic.

Collagen, a protein that is twisted like a DNA strand plays a major role in the elasticity of your skin. Collagen works together with elastin (a protein) that allows your skin to pop back after it’s been stretched.

As we age, collagen and elastin production declines making your skin less elastic. Genes, smoking, UV radiation, stress, inadequate sleep, and poor diet are some of the major factors that contribute to elasticity loss in your skin including around the neck.

Slowing of Fat Cell Regeneration

Cellulite refers to the abnormal fat storage cells located between your muscle tissue and the skin. Once the fat cells enlarge following weight gain, there is an increased gap between the muscle tissue and your skin. Your fibrous strands can no longer stretch to support your skin. This often results to a saggy skin or a turkey neck if it happens at your neck.

As your skin cell regeneration slows down, the fat cells become engorged and can trap in some toxins. This problem is common among women aged over 30. In fact about 80% of women will experience this problem in the course of their lives.

Several approaches have been tried to deal with this condition. They include body wraps, creams, ultrasound, and massage. In some cases, non-surgical treatments may prove futile necessitating surgery.

However, cosmetic surgery is an expensive process that many can not afforhttps://www.consumerhealthdigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/turkey-neck.jpgd. It also poses some risks of infections plus a high cost in maintenance.

Lose* Weight

Sudden weight loss* can contribute to a turkey neck. Not unless with invasive methods for weight loss*, workouts and dieting in an effort to do away with extra pounds will first reflect in your face and neck area.

Since your neck has been stretched by the extra fat, regaining its tightness is quite a challenging process. It’s is essential therefore to come up with gradual weight loss* plan while focusing on every part of your body including your neck.

You will have to check your calorie intake and take up aerobic workouts as a daily routine. Although losing weight and maintaining it is a landmark in one’s life, a turkey neck can be a frustrating condition to almost everyone. It is also common for people to lose* weight as they grow older.

Fortunately, a good lifestyle and cosmetic products are readily in the market for dealing with the turkey neck. Consult with your dermatologist for the best approach for overcoming the unwelcome saggy skin below your chin.

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Author

Contributor : Jeanette Scott (Consumer Health Digest)

Jeanette is a beauty industry consultant, best-selling author, lifestyle writer/reporter, and how-to video producer/host. As a dynamic and relatable media personality, Jeanette loves to share her passion with women, writing about and forecasting upcoming trends and most importantly, inspiring women to feel confident and fabulous through their everyday style choices.

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