Updated: 2019, Aug 2

Menopause Numbness and Tingling Extremities: Symptoms, Causes, Risk factors, Treatments

By - Reviewed by CHD Team
Menopause Numbness and Tingling Extremities

Menopause brings with it a host of many symptoms some of which occur rarely. One of the least occurring of the menopause symptoms is the felling of numbness and tingling in women. While it may not point to great danger, the feeling is quit uncomfortable and unsettling for most women who have gone through it. This feeling could affect any part of the body but is mostly experienced in the legs, feet, arms and hands.

In this article we seek to explore to greater detail what is menopause numbness and tingling feelings.

What is Tingling Extremities and Numbness?

Tingling extremities and numbness are also known as paresthesia. It occurs at any one time and is cause by wrong body postures. When one is in a wrong body posture that pinches on some nerve or puts some pressure on an artery, the limb in question temporarily goes to ‘sleep’ until one adjusts their position to relieve the affected artery or nerve. With such relief, in just a few minutes, the individual is able to regain their normal status.

The tingling effect is characterized by the following symptoms;

  • The ‘pins and needles’ prickly feeling
  • Burning sensation
  • Numbness
  • Increase sensitivity
  • And a creepy crawling feeling

Causes of Tingling Extremities and Numbness

Tingling extremities and numbness among menopausal women could be caused by the effects of reduced estrogen secretion in the body. During menopausal years and the years preceding menopause, the body prepares to stop the functions of reproduction. This preparation involves the decline in the major hormone involved in reproduction-estrogen. Estrogen however when in low levels in the blood stream affects the functioning of the central nervous system in a complex mechanism that results to the tingling extremities and numbness in the body.

While this could be the prime cause for tingling extremities and numbness in menopausal women, there are a host of many other medical causes for tingling extremities and numbness. Here are some of the causes;

  • Diabetes
  • Anxiety
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Stroke
  • Seizures
  • Migraines
  • Nerve injury
  • Herniated disk
  • Insufficient blood supply to a certain area
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Thyroid problems
  • Side effects from medication
  • Exposure to toxins
  • Deficiency in some electrolytes or vitamins

Determining When it is Critical to Call a Doctor and Risks of Tingling Extremities and Numbness

While tingling extremities and numbness may not be a sign of great danger, there are occasions for which one may need to see the doctor immediately. Such occasions include tingling extremities that are accompanied by the following symptoms;

  • Difficulty in walking
  • Paralysis and/or weakness
  • Inability to control the movements of your arms or legs
  • Tingling or numbness on one side of the body
  • Inability to control bowel movements
  • Increased urination
  • Unconsciousness
  • Slurred speech
  • Changes in ability to see
  • Injury of either the back, neck or head regions
  • Muscle spasms
  • Pain
  • Rash

These among others should make you seek the attention of the doctor immediately.

Treatment for Tingling Extremities and Numbness

Tingling extremities and numbness among menopausal women may compromise on the quality of life so that your productivity is affected. It is important that such a problem is not just ignored. It is important for the menopausal woman affected to seek ways of addressing the problem. Here are some of the ways to deal with tingling extremities and numbness.

Natural and Lifestyle Methods

  • Leg Massage and Avoid very High Shoes
    This works especially well for leg numbness and tingling in the leg and feet. Take time to massage your legs and feet. This allows for increased blood flow to the legs and feet.
    Very high shoes increase the pressure on your legs and feet that will only increase the discomfort.
  • Correct Sitting Postures
    Always try to sit upright with your feet flat on the floor. Sitting on your feet or with crossed feet could get one of your nerves or arteries under pressure resulting into the tingling or numbness. If your work entails sitting for the greater part of the day, ensure that you have sufficient breaks to ensure blood flow.
  • Compression Socks
    These help with stimulation of blood flow in the feet. There are helpful especially in places where you have to sit for long hours or where you there is congestion of people.
  • Healthy Diet and Exercise
    A healthy diet comprising of majorly fruits and vegetables is very good in maintaining a healthy body as well as good body weight. Try to avoid processed foods. Remember to exercise as often as is possible. This will help with increased blood flow to your limbs.

Alternative Medicine

Alternative medicine has served for a long term in sorting out menopausal symptoms. Since it serves to address the hormone issue, one would consider alternative medicine but from qualified people to avoid any risks.

Hormone Therapy

Given that tingling extremities in menopausal women is caused by hormonal imbalance in the body, it would be prudent for those suffering to seek hormone replacement therapies for their menopause symptoms.

Conclusion

As discussed above, there is hope for those suffering from tingling extremities and numbness. With the lifestyle changes, one can already get over the tingling extremities and numbness.

Author
Facebook googleplus Twitter

Evan Jensen, CPT

Evan Jensen is a renowned American Nutritionist, Diet Expert and health writer. He has a master’s degree in journalism, with more

View All