Updated: 2019, Jul 14

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The Real Deal – Defining Subjective Premature Ejaculation

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Premature Ejaculation

Premature ejaculation is most definitely one of the most embarrassing and frustrating sexual dysfunctions a man can experience.

But, could it be that your ejaculatory control is completely normal (or even above normal)? Well, most certainly could be! How? Well, if you have subjective premature ejaculation, you believe that you are suffering from PE, when in reality, your ejaculatory function is perfectly “normal.”

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The good news is that this article not only explains what it is, but how you can move past it, so you have the best sex ever! But, first let’s explore the four types of PE.

What are the Four Types of Premature Ejaculation?

Most specialists agree that premature ejaculation (PE) affects approximately 30%[1] of males, but did you know that there are actually four forms of PE? Well, it’s true! The four forms of PE are: lifelong, acquired, variable, and subjective.

And, guess what? Subjective premature ejaculation is one of the most common types! So, what are differences between the four types of PE? Well, lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE) is a condition that is present from the beginning, but manifests during puberty or the first sexual experience.

In fact, Dr. Marcel Waldinger, a renowned neuropsychiatrist, found that LPE is hereditary in approximately 91%[2] of men. Acquired premature ejaculation (APE) is a condition that presents later in life.

In other words, men with APE have “normal” ejaculatory functions at first, and then suddenly start ejaculating too early. This type of PE is usually triggered by a stressful or traumatic event or a hormonal imbalance.

Variable premature ejaculation (VPE) tends to be the most irregular and inconsistent out of all of the types of PE.

With this type of PE, a man may originally ejaculate “normally” and then suddenly experience premature ejaculation – but only with certain partners and at specific times.

Lastly, subjective premature ejaculation (SPE) is the belief that there is a problem with ejaculation – acutely or chronically, even if this belief is not rooted in reality.

Men with SPE fear that they are ejaculating too early, even after a specialist tells them that there is nothing wrong with the timing of their ejaculations. As a result of this belief, men with SPE become preoccupied with delaying ejaculation for as long as possible.

According to a recent Turkish study[3] on the four types of PE, 2.3% men experience LPE, 3.9% experience APE, 8.5% experience VPE, and 5.1% experience SPE, which means that SPE is the second most common form of premature ejaculation.

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So, How can I tell if my Premature Ejaculation is Subjective?

Premature Ejaculation is Subjective

To determine if you have a subjective premature ejaculation, you will need to ask yourself the following questions: “How does my ejaculatory latency compare to other men in my age group?” “Am I lasting long enough?” And, how long should sex last?” Well, according to studies[4], the typical sexual encounter lasts anywhere from 3-to-7 minutes, but the truth is, the length of sex really depends on the man and his partner – what they feel comfortable with and what satisfies them.

What else should I look out for? Subjective premature ejaculation (SPE) is a condition that arises when a man becomes consumed with the belief that he has premature ejaculation, when he may not have it at all.

Most men with SPE complain that they can’t control the timing of their ejaculation, even though, a specialist, sex therapist, or physician has examined them and found no dysfunction. It is a feeling that “something isn’t right” that is hard to shake.

So, what is the real definition of subjective premature ejaculation? Well, the Oxford Dictionary defines the term “subjective,”[5] as being based on, or influenced by, one’s personal feelings, tastes, and/or opinions and the term “premature ejaculation,”as the release of semen[6] before or immediately after penetration.”

So, when the term “subjective” is added to the term “premature ejaculation,” the definition of SPE is a personal feeling, belief, or opinion that one is ejaculating too early.

What are the Possible Underlying Causes?

What are the Possible Underlying Causes

Some studies[7] suggests that subjective premature ejaculation stems from psychological and culture factors – unlike acquired premature ejaculation, which is linked to medical factors or lifelong premature ejaculation, which is linked to neurobiological factors. Other studies,[8] however, suggest that psychological and/or relationship issues are to blame for the emergence of SPE.

In addition, some sex therapists cite pornography,[9] as a possible cause of SPE. The belief is that some men develop faulty beliefs that sex should last a certain amount of time, based on what they see on television. This typically occurs in teenage boys and young men, under the age of 40.

How Can Men Stop Being Preoccupied with their “Imagined” Subjective Premature Ejaculation?

Imagined

Well, there are a number of helpful techniques that help men last longer in, but if your premature ejaculation is subjective, it may not be the right path for you.

Sex therapists agree that the best way to help men stop being preoccupied with their “imagined” subjective premature ejaculation is to teach men, their partners, and the population, in general that sexual function, ejaculation times, and performance vary amongst individuals.

Many times, SPE is reduced or alleviated, once men are told that their experiences parallel the experiences of other men in their age groups. And, because there are no biological factors underlying this form of PE, pharmacotherapy is not recommended.

Therefore, the recommended interventions[10] include: education, support, reassurance, and psychotherapy (i.e. sex therapy and/or cognitive-behavioral therapy).

A man with SPE can benefit from a sex therapist, who specializes in sexual dysfunctions. Sex therapists help men identify the thoughts and behaviors that are triggering this condition.

Cognitive behavioral therapist can also help stop a man’s subjective premature ejaculation by helping him find the root of his destructive thoughts and faulty behaviors (i.e. premature ejaculation).

The most common therapy[11] used to treat SPE is cognitive-behavior therapy. So, the good news is that even with this this condition, a man can prolong his ejaculation, so he can last longer in bed.

Conclusion

Premature ejaculation is not a pleasant thing to deal with – regardless of the type. The good news, however, is that most cases can be easily treated.

If you suffer from subjective premature ejaculation, things like re-education cognitive-behavioral therapy or sex therapy may be exactly what you’ve been looking for!

So, if this is an issue that truly bothers you – take action and don’t allow it to have a negative impact on your life. You don’t have to suffer with PE, but the choice is in your hands!

This is a sponsored post written by R.Y Langham. The opinions expressed in this article are the sponsor’s own. Learn more about contributing for Consumer Health Digest.

Image Credits

Feature Image: Shutterstock.com

In-Post Image: Shutterstock.com

References
[1] Waldinger, M. D. (2011). Toward evidence-based genetic research on lifelong premature ejaculation: A critical evaluation of methodology. Korean Journal of Urology, 52(1), 1–8. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3037500/
[2] Saitz,T. H., & Serefoglu, E. C. (2016). The epidemiology of premature ejaculation. Translational Andrology and Urology, 5(4). http://tau.amegroups.com/article/view/10575/11762
[3] Between Us Clinic. (2018). How to last longer in bed – The complete guide. Retrieved from https://www.betweenusclinic.com/premature-ejaculation/how-to-last-longer-in-bed/
[4] Oxford Dictionary. (2018). Subjective. Retrieved from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/subjective
[5] Oxford Dictionary. (2018). Premature ejaculation. Retrieved from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/prematureejaculation
[6] McMahon, C. G., Jannini, E. A., Serefoglu, E. C., & Hellstrom, W. J. G. (2016). The pathophysiology of acquired premature ejaculation. Translational Andrology and Urology, 5(4), 434–449. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5001985/#r54
[7] Waguih, W.I. & Waldinger, M.D. (2017). Chapter 18: Evaluation of premature ejaculation. The Textbook of Clinical Sexual Medicine. Springer. Retrieved from https://books.google.com/books?id=ZyYmDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA279&lpg=PA279&dq=subjective+premature+ejqculation&source=bl&ots=-cp7xra9iC&sig=ioWGOFQuLMujIF_21PZ1-cJjTIw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiIx--LgqPZAhVnja0KHdejApI4ChDoATAIegQICxAB#v=onepage&q=subjective%20premature%20ejqculation&f=true
[8] Phillips, N. (2014). Premature ejaculation: how quick is too quick? The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved from https://www.smh.com.au/technology/premature-ejaculation-how-quick-is-too-quick-20140522-zrl1k.html
[9] Stanley, E. (2016). Psychosexual therapy for premature ejaculation. Translational Andrology and Urology, 5(4). Retrieved from http://tau.amegroups.com/article/view/10700/11769
[10] Corty, E. W. & Guardiani, J.M. (2008). Canadian and American sex therapists' perceptions of normal and abnormal ejaculatory latencies: how long should intercourse last? J Sex Med, 5(5), 1251-1256. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18331255
[11] Hollon, S.D., Beck, A.T. (2013). Chapter 11: Cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapies.” In Bergin and Garfield’s Handbook of Psychotherapy and Behavior Change (6th Ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 393–394.
Author

R.Y Langham

Dr. R.Y. Langham holds a Master of Science in marriage and family therapy and a Ph.D. in family psychology. She serves as a professiona

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