Safe Sex: What You Should Know!

Safe Sex
Editor's Note: This article has been recently updated with latest information and research studies.
 

How To Explain Safe Sex?

In recent years, the level of awareness related to “safe” sex has grown significantly, a fact which many believe has helped to reduce* the onset of a variety of sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancies. That being said, the growing sophistication of medicine has also created a “fall back” option for those who may have engaged in unsafe sex and experienced unwanted consequences in a variety of manifestations.

In order to properly explain the “do’s” and “don’ts” of safe sex, we’ve created a brief overview of some of the primary tenants of healthy intercourse. This information is designed to serve as a series of guideposts for those who may not have engaged in sexual intercourse previously, or have, for whatever reason, not required this knowledge. For those who have any additional questions about safe sex practices, we highly recommend discussing specific concerns with a medical professional. It’s important for individuals to have a high degree of “clarity” when it comes to safe sex. Knowledge that may be incomplete or, in the majority of cases, incorrect, can result in drastic consequences for both men and women.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: The Basics

Before discussing methods for preventing the onset of sexually transmitted diseases, it’s important for readers to understand exactly what they’re trying to ward off! Sexually transmitted diseases can take a variety of forms, ranging from viral transmission to bacterial infections. Typically, “STDs” can be transmitted when uninfected regions of the body come into contact with genital areas that carry the infection. For example, genital herpes, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, can be passed from the host to an uninfected person through oral sex, anal sex and vaginal intercourse that is undertaken without appropriate protection. It’s important to mention that not all sexually transmitted diseases contain overtly visible physical manifestations. Because of this, a “visual check” can’t necessarily determine if an individual is uninfected. Although latex-based barriers such as condoms can be used to thwart the spread of sexually transmitted diseases or infections, they are in no way a “cure*” for these problems.

Diagnosis

The importance of detection via sexually transmitted disease testing cannot be emphasized enough. As stated previously, many of these infections remain “invisible” to the naked eye. Additionally, particular sexually transmitted diseases cannot truly be “cured,” making them a lasting, viable threat for individuals who have contracted them. Thanks to the relative ease and “pain-free” methods involved I STD testing, it’s highly recommended that individuals who have had multiple sexual partners within recent history be tested for any infections. This knowledge will not only help individuals embark upon an appropriate treatment regimen, but will also decrease* the risk of having them unknowingly spread these viruses to their sexual partners. STD tests can be obtained through a variety of outlets, including student health centers, general practitioner offices, hospitals and family planning centers.

Prevention

One of the most accessible and affordable methods of STD prevention is a latex barrier, most commonly known as a condom. Condoms are designed to act as both a preventative contraceptive and STD prevention tool. Condoms can be purchased through a variety of retail outlets, many of which stock a variety of brands and types of condoms depending upon an individual’s particular wants or needs. Due to the relative “ease of use” of the condom, these products are popular tools for sexually active adults of all ages. Their consistent effectiveness has made them one of the most highly recommended products that can be used to ensure that sex remains a healthy and responsible activity.

Conclusion

Although it seems that numerous educational resources are available for individuals to learn more about safe sex, a small number of people still choose to engage in “unsafe” sex with their partners. Because of this, it’s important for those initiating a new sexual relationship with a partner to be particularly vigilant, ensuring* that any future intimacy will be undertaken on a responsible, educated basis. Not only is this a responsible tool for maintaining health, it is also a symbol of mutual respect. Ensuring* that both individuals are “protected” should be of paramount concern.

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Author

Expert Author : Mark Simms (Consumer Health Digest)

Mark Simms is a prolific freelance health and beauty writer, independent researcher with a long history and expertise of providing reliable and relatable health content for magazines, newsletters, websites including blogs and journals. He also enjoy exploring men’s and women’s health category writing articles about sex and relationships, product review and providing information on sexual health.