Updated: 2019, Nov 29

Premature Ejaculation (PE) Doesn’t Have to Be a Problem: Here Are Several Great Solutions

Premature ejaculation can create a disconnect between you and your partner and diminish feelings of intimacy.
Premature Ejaculation (PE) Doesn’t Have to Be a Problem: Here Are Several Great Solutions

You may not feel like discussing the topic at your next guys’ night out. But if you’re struggling with premature ejaculation (PE)—sometimes called rapid ejaculation (RE)—you should not feel shy about discussing it with your doctor.

Many men feel intense embarrassment around issues with PE. This is understandable, but although it is a very private problem that most of your friends may not openly talk about, rest assured that you’re not alone.

According to the Mayo Clinic, one in three men will struggle with PE at some point in their lives. Since so many feel shame about the issue and these statistics are self-reported, that number is likely even higher.

What are the Symptoms of PE?

Occasional premature ejaculation happens to everyone and is no cause for concern, but a diagnosis of PE may be made by your doctor if you:

  • Usually ejaculate after one minute—or less—of penetration.
  • Have an inability to delay an ejaculation most of the time.
  • Feel enough distress over these matters that you avoid sex with partners.

An inability to delay ejaculation for at least one minute after penetration is the primary symptom of PE but there are many possible risk factors and causes. One Korean study revealed a significant association between depression and PE.

Some men struggle with the issue most of the time, while others experience rapid ejaculation more variably or under other special circumstances, like a stressful event in their lives.

As a rule, if you consistently experience ejaculation sooner than you would like, speak with your doctor. Not only is PE a problem shared by many men, but it is also highly treatable. There is no viable reason to suffer in silence.

What are the Possible Causes of PE?

The possible causes for PE are quite diverse, and can stem from both psychological and physiological factors. Available treatments include behavioral techniques, counseling, and medications. All of these can help immensely.

Psychological causes can include body image issues, everyday stresses, a history of sexual abuse and just plain worrying too much about PE. Physical causes can be anything from hormone or neurotransmitter levels that are abnormal to infections of the urethra or prostate.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a surprising risk factor that can contribute to PE. ED causes anxiety around getting and maintaining erections, making you feel the need to rush through sex for fear of losing your erection.

Many Treatment Options are Available

There are lots of treatments available for PE that range from behavioral techniques to medications and counseling, but some combination of all three may be your best bet for effective treatment.

These options include:

  • Behavioral techniques:
  • Pelvic floor exercises, also known as Kegel exercises, strengthen muscles that help control ejaculation. To get the benefits of these movements, just tighten the muscles that prevent you from passing gas or allow you to stop urinating.

    Hold that contraction for three seconds, then relax for three seconds. Do this several times per session, at least once a day.

    Another behavioral technique is the pause-squeeze technique, where your partner squeezes the part of your penis where the head meets the shaft, maintaining pressure for a few seconds until you no longer feel the urge to ejaculate.

    Stopping sex just before ejaculation and starting again after your level of arousal lessens is another, a similar method known as the stop-start technique.

    You can also use condoms to lessen sensitivity, and there are even special topical agents to decrease sensation.

  • Counseling:
  • Speaking to a mental health provider about your feelings, experiences and the nature of your relationships can relieve some of the stress around PE and help you to address its root causes.

    For your best chance of symptom relief, be sure to choose an objective and caring therapist, and be as honest as you can about your history and all the other factors that may be contributing to your PE.

  • Medication:
    There are many available pharmaceutical options for treatment including:

    • SSRI Antidepressants: SSRIs like Prozac and Zoloft can be used to prolong sexual performance but the unpleasant side effects of these drugs can include drowsiness and decreased libido, which perhaps goes a bit too far in addressing the problem.
    • Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors: Often used in combination with SSRIs, these medications are usually prescribed to treat erectile dysfunction. Unwanted effects include headaches and indigestion.
    • Analgesics: Studies show that medications used for pain relief, like Tramadol, can have delayed ejaculation as a side effect.

Other side effects that are not so great are dizziness and nausea, especially with regular usage.

Effective Options Don’t Have to Have Unpleasant Side Effects

The most promising pharmaceutical intervention is also one of the most accessible and least invasive.

Promescent is an over-the-counter spray that uses numbing agent lidocaine to decrease sensitivity and prolong performance time.

Promescent has been demonstrated to work in a study.

Promescent

The spray is absorbed so quickly and completely that it doesn’t numb your partner. And just as importantly, it does not lessen the experience of your climax either.

The reviews for the spray are very promising—one tester reported that his performance time more than doubled after he began using it. And according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), topical applications that reduce sensitivity significantly extend intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IVELT). Discuss this option with your doctor if it sounds like an appealing avenue.

Taking a Proactive Approach is Best

Premature ejaculation can create a disconnect between you and your partner and diminish feelings of intimacy. Try not to let stress and feelings of shame prevent you from discussing the issue openly with your partner.

Being open with your partner is as important as discussing PE with your doctor. The more transparency you have the courage to create, the more likely you are to heal and move past the issue.

Your partner likely feels stressed too—and powerless to help. Research from the University of Zurich found that men who are hyper-focused on delaying ejaculation are too distracted during sex to connect with their partners.

This creates distance between you and affects not only your sexual interactions but the whole of your relationship.

When you take the important step of opening up the lines of communication and taking advantage of the combination of treatment options that work best for you, PE can become a thing of the past.

More Resources

Author
Twitter

Claire Polansky, Ph.D. M.A.

Claire Polansky is a content writer for Tel Aviv University and a freelance writer deeply committed to health, animal welfare, and soci

Related Posts

View All