What Is Retrograde Ejaculation, And How Is It Treated?

Q: I am 39, when I do sex with my partner my semen goes backward instead of coming outside. Is this the retrograde ejaculation? What treatments are available to cure* it?
Expert Answer

Retrograde ejaculation refers to a condition when during an orgasm, the ejaculate travels backwards in to the bladder instead of coming out through the head of the penis. This problem, however, doesn’t affect a man’s orgasm but result to little semen or dry orgasm. A retrograde ejaculation has not been proven to have any harmful effects in men but can be linked to some cases of male infertility. Infertility in men with this condition occurs when the semen is little or lacking to provide a medium for sperms to reach an egg.

Causes Of Retrograde Ejaculation

Retrograde Ejaculation

According to a Harvard Health Publication, retrograde ejaculation is caused by a malfunctioning of the sphincter muscle at the bladder entrance. During a normal ejaculation, the sphincter muscle closes off during an orgasm preventing semen from entering the bladder. Improper functioning of the sphincter muscle allows all or some of the semen to move back during an orgasm. According to health experts, nerve damage is the primary cause of retrograde ejaculation. Common causes of nerve damages are:

  • Injury following a surgery such as prostrate surgery, rectal surgery, intestinal surgery, or lower spine surgery. Such surgeries may affect how your bladder sphincter muscle closes during an orgasm.
  • Chronic illnesses including diabetes and multiple sclerosis.
  • Effects from drugs during treatments of other medical conditions including depression.
  • While retrograde ejaculation doesn’t hamper a man’s ability to achieve and maintain an erection, it accounts for 1% of male infertility cases in the US.

Symptoms

Symptoms of retrograde ejaculation are not very conspicuous although absence or very little semen after an ejaculation is a common sign. Men with this kind of condition are diagnosed by sampling of semen in their urine. The urine appears cloudy following a sexual intercourse.

Treatment

Health experts say that retrograde ejaculation doesn’t require treatment unless if it interferes with one’s fertility. Treatment is based on the actual cause in such cases. Depending on the cause of retrograde ejaculation, medications may work or fail. For example, if you undergo a surgical operation that results to permanent physical changes of your anatomy such as bladder or transurethral surgeries, no medications can help if you develop retrograde ejaculation. On the other hand, drugs may work if retrograde ejaculation results from nerve injury caused by diabetes, multiple sclerosis or certain surgeries. In cases where some medications are the cause of retrograde ejaculation, your physician may suggest alternative treatments or discontinuation of such drugs for some period. Common drugs intended to cure* retrograde ejaculation include Imipramine (Tofranil), antihistamines such as Chlorpheniramine and brompheanine, decongestant drugs such as Silfedrine and Sudafed. However, these medications exclusively treat* the underlying causes of retrograde ejaculation and not the actual condition.

Retrograde Ejaculation Treatment Complications

Retrograde ejaculation treatment drugs help in keeping the bladder neck muscle closed during an orgasm. Although they are effective in dealing with retrograde ejaculatiion, they have both minor and major side effects. Some may have serious reactions when combined with other medicines taken for treating a chronic illness. Certain drugs used in treating retrograde ejaculation increases* your blood pressure and heart rate. They are therefore not recommended for use in patients who have high blood pressure and heart disease.

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Author

Contributor : Mark Simms (Consumer Health Digest)

Mark Simms is a prolific freelance health and beauty writer, independent researcher with a long history and expertise of providing reliable and relatable health content for magazines, newsletters, websites including blogs and journals. He also enjoy exploring men’s and women’s health category writing articles about sex and relationships, product review and providing information on sexual health.

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