Simple Hacks to Increase* Cognitive Function without Drugs

Simple Hacks to Increase Cognitive Function without Drugs
Editor's Note: This article has been recently updated with latest information and research studies.
 

Stress, aging, unhealthy lifestyle, and many other factors have a major impact on your cognitive function. Experiencing problems with focus and concentration, decision-making, or memory isn’t uncommon. All of us deal with those issues from time to time. In order to improve* cognitive skills a lot of people take medications and although they can help, you can enhance* these functions in a natural, drug-free fashion too. Here are some hacks you will find extremely useful.

Go For a Walk

Walking is the most affordable way to stay in shape and improve* your cognitive function. All you need is to put on some comfortable shoes and start walking around the block, to a park, anywhere you want. You can even walk to work or take stairs instead of the elevator. Benefits of walking are well-documented.

For example, a study whose findings were published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine revealed that sedentary lifestyle is strongly associated with lower cognitive performance. On the other hand, moderate-intensity walking regimen has the potential to reduce* symptoms of cognitive impairment and improve* brain function.

Be Creative

Being creative is important for many reasons such as stress relief, freedom to express yourself, and improvement of cognitive functions. Some people think they aren’t creative, but that isn’t entirely correct. We are all creative and talented, but for different things. Someone is a creative writer, others like to paint, opportunities are endless and you just have to find the skill you excel in.

Evidence shows that creative hobbies such as pottery, quilting, woodworking, or painting keep your brain sharp as you’re getting older. In fact, researchers at Mayo Clinic found that participants who engaged in artistic hobbies including painting, drawing, and sculpture were 73% less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment than those who did not.

Reading Benefits Info

Read

So many books, so little time! If you like to read now you have an additional motivation to continue whereas individuals who aren’t a fan of books have a good reason to start. A study whose findings were published in the journal Age found that mental training consisting of reading and engaging in arithmetic problem solving is a great way to improve* cognitive function.

Furthermore, the Brain Connectivity published a study which showed that reading fiction has the beneficial impact on cognitive functioning. Stepping into the imaginary world that novels offer enhances* connectivity in the brain particularly because you put yourself in other person’s shoes. As a result, your brain becomes more active. This activity is vital for proper functioning just like physical activity matters for your body.

Socialize

Humans are social creatures. Socializing doesn’t only keep you up to date with people around you; it also offers a multitude of health benefits including improved* cognitive function. A growing body of evidence shows that a simple act of talking to other people provides important mental health benefits. Social interaction provides a short-term boost* to executive function comparable to playing brain games.

Meditate

Other Things to Do

Conclusion

Our cognitive functioning depends on numerous factors including lifestyle decisions we make on a daily basis. The good thing is, you can improve* your cognitive abilities even without medications. Start exercising more (it’s never too late), socialize, read, and express your creativity. All these activities make your brain work harder and improve* its functioning.

References

  • https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2276592/
  • http://ur.umich.edu/1011/Nov01_10/1725-friends-with-cognitive

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Author

Expert Author : Dr. Ahmed Zayed (Consumer Health Digest)

Dr. Ahmed Zayed Helmy holds a baccalaureate of Medicine and Surgery. He has completed his degree in 2011 at the University of Alexandria, Egypt. Dr. Ahmed believes in providing knowledgeable information to readers. Other than his passion for writing, currently he is working as a Plastic surgeon and is doing his masters at Ain shams University.