Make Your Home A Healthier Place With These 12 Simple Ways

Make Your Home A Healthier Place
 

Home is where the heart is and given that it’s the place where we spend most of our time, it’s certainly where the health is as well. From the amount of natural light you get every day to unseen germs and bacteria that might be lurking around the corner, there are things you must pay attention to if you want to maintain your house properly and make it into a place of peace.

To help you keep your personal space safe, healthy and comfortable, here are some handy tips that will transform it into a real sanctuary for you and your family.

Careful how you Clean

Harsh cleaning chemicals[1] are not the safest thing to be around, especially if you have children or pets that tend to crawl or run barefoot on the floors and can have their skin easily damaged. The fumes that come from these products are harmful as well and can lead to respiratory irritations or worsen conditions such as asthma.

The best thing you can do is reduce* their usage and switch them out for natural mixtures that are less toxic, but just as effective. For example, if you dissolve 4 tablespoons of baking soda in a liter of warm water you’ll have a pretty great all-purpose cleaner on your hands, and you could also use things like borax, lemon juice, white vinegar, and salt to scrape the dirt away.

Avoid heavier Curtains

While you might be tempted to draw those blackout curtains and get more sleep in the morning, natural light is actually very beneficial for our health. It helps regulate our sleep cycle and can have a great effect on our brain function, immune system, hormones, and even blood pressure.

Keep the dust at Bay

Keep the dust at bay

Dust can cause issues with our respiratory system, and it can be particularly harsh on those who suffer from allergies. You should vacuum the rugs once a week (or at least once every two weeks) to prevent it from settling in, and make sure to wash the towels and give the furniture a thorough wipe with a microfiber cloth as well.

Air out the space Frequently

While on the subject of allergies, it’s important to remember that anyone who suffers from respiratory allergies will need as much fresh, clean air as possible. Something that could really help is a purifier, and if you want to grab one, bear in mind that the best air purifiers for allergies contain a HEPA filter[2] and can help you keep pet dander, pollen, mold, dust, and even light odors at bay.

It’s also a good idea to open your windows and let the fresh air from the outside come in the evening, when pollen levels are low.

Get a Pet

A house is always a better home with a loving pet that waits to greet you as soon as you step through the door. Not only do pets reduce* anxiety and depression, they can actually help you get more exercise and live a healthier lifestyle.

If hypertension or other cardiovascular issues plague you, getting a dog[3] might actually be one of the best things you could do (provided, of course, that you actually like dog and genuinely want an animal companion).

Change out your Toothbrushes and Sponges

Change out your toothbrushes and sponges

Toothbrushes and sponges are some of the items that trap the largest amount of bacteria in your household. The dampness makes it a good breeding ground for them, and the best way to control this is to simply change them every two weeks. You absolutely don’t need special, expensive toothbrushes, you merely need to switch out your regular ones with some frequency.

Avoid traces of lead

Topsoil in certain urban areas can be contaminated with lead. The amounts are usually very low, but to make sure they don’t get into your home, ask all your guests to remove* their shoes as soon as they enter the door to prevent them from bringing it in.

Paint your Walls

The colors that surround us can influence our mental balance. Red, for example, can elevate blood pressure, arouse the senses, and make us hungrier. Softer colors like light blue and green have a much more soothing effect, and rooms with blue walls seem to be the best choice for a good night’s sleep[4].

Grab a few Plants

Grab a few plants

Plants are soothing to the eye and can help you remove* air toxins and keep the air fresher and the room clearer. They also increase* humidity levels and can ease the symptoms of a sore throat and headaches, and lower tension in people who suffer from anxiety.

Store the food in Glass containers

There is a concern[5] that plastics containing bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates, chemicals used in food packaging, are harmful to our health due to the transfer when food is kept in plastic containers. Glass jars and containers might be a better option, so invest in a few to store your leftovers safely.

Keep your Home Cool

About 65 degrees is the optimal temperature for a good night’s sleep, and keeping a cooler home is generally healthier. Heating can dry out our skin and irritate our eyes, and it makes us more restless at night. Lower the temperature and bundle up under a blanket to rest better.

Keep healthy Food in the Pantry

Keep healthy food in the pantry

What better way to eat healthier than by surrounding yourself with healthy options? Hunger pangs make us crave junk food and sweets, but if you have none in the house and store mostly fruits, veggies, and homemade snacks, then you won’t have any choice but to eat better.

Conclusion

Making your home healthier doesn’t need to require huge, unaffordable changes. Small things like repainting the walls, keeping your home cool and well-aired, and sticking to better cleaning supplies can make a pretty big difference. We recommend that you write down a list of things that you want to change in your home and implement it slowly.

A healthy environment comes from more conscientious choices and a sustainable way of living, so if you want a safer, better home adopt an eco-friendly mindset and follow these tips to keep it easy.

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Author

Expert Author : Zara Lewis (Consumer Health Digest)

Zara Lewis is a regular contributor at ripped.me, a traveller and a mother to two. Originally from Chicago, she found her place in the sun in Perth, Australia. Passionate about creating a better world for the generations to come, she enjoys sharing her knowledge and experience with others. You can follow her on Facebook and Twitter

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