STD’s in Women: Know About Awareness and Risk Factors

Editor's Note: This article has been recently updated with latest information and research studies.
 
STD in Women

Awareness of common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in women is necessary part of being healthy. Sexually transmitted diseases are more common than most women think and being aware of this can increase* a woman’s chances or not contracting one.

Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in Women

It is believed that one out of every four college students is infected with a sexually transmitted disease. With the cost of treating the reported cases of STDs soaring to $17 billion annually, it is time to make sure that women are educated about the risks and statistics that are associated with sexually transmitted diseases

Risk Factors

A woman’s risk of contracting a sexually transmitted disease is effected by the choices she makes regarding her lifestyle and behavior, along with having incomplete or incorrect knowledge. The main contributors to a woman’s risk being increased include improper and infrequent use of condoms and being monogamous. Other risky behaviors include excessive alcohol consumption and not understanding how to effectively use oral contraceptives.

How Big is the Threat?

It is estimated that one out of every four college students currently have a sexually transmitted disease. The CDC estimates that almost half of the 19 million new cases of STDs reported each year are from college aged women and men and are costing the health care system $17 billion annually. The threat also grows larger when it is taken into account that 91 percent of women with newly reported cases of HPV, the virus become almost undetectable after two years. This has helped to make HPV the current most transmitted sexual disease on college campuses.

Factors Behind the Big Numbers

Unprotected sex is the leading cause for the increase* in cases of sexually transmitted diseases, with the majority of these numbers coming from women who do not use a condom during oral sex. A smaller reason for the increase* comes from women simply not understanding how easy it is to contract a sexually transmitted disease and how their behavior can affect their chances.

Female Sexually Transmitted Diseases

The most common infections in the United States, particularly among college aged women are sexually transmitted diseases.

Disease Descriptions

  • AIDS affects and weakens the immune system.
  • Herpes is transmitted by skin contact and appears as sores around the mouth and groin.
  • Chlamydia is a common bacterial infection in women.
  • Gonorrhea is most often spread from sexual contact.
  • Hepatitis affects the liver and can be fatal if left untreated.
  • Syphilis is also spread from sexual contact.

Symptoms in Women

Fatigue, swollen lymph glands, aches and abnormal vaginal discharge are all symptoms of a sexually transmitted disease. Some women may also experience pain or burning during urination.

Transmission

An STD can be transmitted through bodily fluid or skin contact, blood and even foreign objects can also pass the disease between sexual partners.

Prevention

Women who want to protect themselves from an STD can educate themselves, along with practice safe sexual habits. Being educated is also one of the first steps women need to take to prevent contracting a sexual disease.

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Author

Expert Author : Mark Simms (Consumer Health Digest)

Mark Simms is a prolific freelance health and beauty writer, independent researcher with a long history and expertise of providing reliable and relatable health content for magazines, newsletters, websites including blogs and journals. He also enjoy exploring men’s and women’s health category writing articles about sex and relationships, product review and providing information on sexual health.