X

Eyelash Dyes: Is it Safe to Dye Your Eyelashes?

Editor's Note: This article has been recently updated with latest information and research studies.

What are Eyelash Dyes?

It’s safe to say that thick and beautifully dark hair just scream sultry! This goes the same with eyelashes. Just like your hair, your eyelashes can be dyed beautifully dark too! The question is, is it worth it? Is it safe? Does it really get results done?

Why You Need Eyelash Dyes?

Obviously, the darker your lashes the thicker it looks. For a lot of blonde women or any woman with light hair, light eyelashes can kind of be a drag since they look unnoticeable and do not give your eyes definition like dark lashes will. A lot of women also opt to dye their lashes since they want to skip the inconvenience of having to apply mascara in the morning.

Who Can Use The Eyelash Dyes?

A lot of women with light hair will usually go for this beauty out of obvious need. But basically everyone can have their eyelashes dyed. Of course we always have to consider children as an exemption since their eyes are extremely sensitive and no matter how organic a dye is it still has chemicals in it that could cause negative reactions in kids.

What are The Dyes Made of?

This is where it gets kind of tricky. A lot of eyelash dyes nowadays claim* to be vegetable dyes but that is all merely a dream. Even if the dye is made of vegetables, there is still a need to mix the color with peroxide in order for the chemical process to become successful. The dye will not successfully latch on to the lashes without the peroxide. Judging from all the hair dyes we have tried, peroxide is made up of pure chemical, even merely smelling it can prove that! Imagine having this ingredient so close to your eyes. Doesn’t that kind of scare you?

Are there really any truly safe dyes for lashes? We, unfortunately, have to answer this question in the negative. Even Lynn Shulman, an owner of a spa in Toronto which specializes in purely organic treatments had this to say: “I get calls all the time from people looking for natural-formula eyelash tinting. But it doesn’t exist. If a dye is going to deposit color, it will have chemicals.”

Is It Ever Safe to Dye Eyelashes?

It seems that there is more bad than good in eyelash dyes. To prove this point, the Food and Drug Administration or the FDA in the United States of America has banned most eyelash dyes since they are coal-tar based. Also, Health Canada has listed such products in its Cosmetics Ingredient Hotlist of ingredients or substances not allowed or prohibited in cosmetics.

However, dermatologists like Doctor Jeanette Graf has been quoted to say that as long as the eyelash dying is done by a well-trained and highly experienced professional esthetician then there really is not much to be worried about. As long as it is done by a professional, reports of side effects are next to none.

Application Tips

Although we will be telling you here how this whole process works, we cannot stress this enough, have a professional and experienced esthetician to do it! Nonetheless, for purposes of guiding you, we have listed below the steps and the process in dying your lashes.

  • Do your research. Look for the best salon in your area that specializes in eyelash dying. This will probably set you back around $20 to $40 depending on which salon you choose.
  • Choose your color. Most women opt for black or brown for a more natural look but for those with a little bit of a wild streak, blue-black is a pretty popular choice.
  • The esthetician will have you sit down with a towel around your neck, which serves as a sort of a protection for your clothes. Protective cream will also be applied unto your eye area.
  • A cotton pad shaped like a crescent moon will be laid on top of the cream.
  • The tint will be applied using a very fine brush and will set for around 10 minutes.
  • The esthetician then removes* any excess dye using water and possibly any staining on your skin will be removed as well.
  • The dye will probably stay for about 3 months if its well taken care of. Avoid using any sort of glycolic cleansers or creams since this can slowly remove* the dye.

How to Remove* it?

The dye can be removed with the use of warm water, cooking oil, KY Jelly and eye makeup remover. Just be careful not to tug too hard as this may cause damage to your lashes.

Cautions!

  • Remove* your contact lenses before having your lashes dyed.
  • Perform a patch test around 24 to 48 hours before the treatment to ensure that you are not allergic to the dye.
  • If you feel a slight burning* sensation in your eyes (possibly because of the peroxide) flush your eyes under cold water.

Conclusion

Like most beauty treatments, we also have you decide for yourself whether or not you think this treatment could be the one for you. In this case, eyelash dying has not been fully approved by the authorities. We would advise you to only get this if you feel like you really need it like when you have extremely blonde lashes. For those that are looking for more defined lashes then maybe sticking to mascara for now would be a good idea.