7 Best Vitamins and Antioxidants for Skin Care

Antioxidants for Skin Care
Editor's Note: This article has been recently updated with latest information and research studies.
 

Very few people are aware of the surest means towards a youthful and radiant skin. The most crucial basics when it comes to skincare include eating a healthy diet, protecting against harmful rays of the sun, engaging in regular exercise, and quit smoking. Essential nutrients including minerals, vitamins and antioxidants are crucial if your goal is a healthy glowing skin. You can incorporate them in your diet or apply them directly on to your skin. Here are some of the most effective ingredients for a radiant skin:

1. Vitamins C and E and Selenium

Several studies have found that Vitamin C and Vitamin E plus selenium can prevent your skin damage against sun exposure including cancer. In addition, these ingredients can reverse* several skin conditions, such as discoloration, fine lines and wrinkles. These antioxidants work by speeding up your skin’s natural repair process while preventing further damages, according to Karen E. Burke MD, PhD, from Mt. Sinai School of Medicine. Burke recommends use of supplements containing up to 3,000 milligrams of vitamin C, 400 international units of vitamin E and between 100 and 200 micrograms of selenium every day.

2. Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 refers to a natural antioxidant that promotes* the growth of cells while protecting them against carcinogens. Level of coenzyme Q10 declines as we grow old contributing to aging of the skin. In reference to a study published in the journal Biofactors, topical application of coenzyme Q10 diminished* wrinkle formation. Nearly all the studies conducted up to date use 0.3% concentration of coenzyme Q10.

3. Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Alpha-Lipoic Acid

Alpha-lipoic acid is an antioxidant which has been shown to be effective in protecting the skin against sun damage. It is topically applied directly on the skin. When applied on a regular basis, cosmetic products have been shown to improve* skin conditions that occur due to sun exposure.

4. Retinoic Acid

In reference to burke, retinoic acid, the active form of vitamin A, is a major ingredient in several anti-aging skin care treatments. When applied topically, retinoic acid help alleviate* skin conditions like age spots, wrinkles, and dryness of skin caused by exposure to sunlight. Researchers in a study published in the Journal of Dermatological Science realized that topical application of retinoic acid improves* production collagen and elastin, making the skin tight while reducing* appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.

5. Flavonoids

Flavonoids are extracts made from green tea and chocolate that are helpful in improving* the health and appearance of your skin. Studies have shown that flavonoids are strong antioxidants that can shield your skin against cancer and inflammation. A German study published in the Journal of Nutrition unveiled that women who took hot tea or cocoa with high flavonoid content for three months developed softer and smoother skin than women who took hot cocoa with low flavonoid content.

6. B Vitamins

B Vitamins

B vitamins play important in promoting the growth of healthy cells throughout your body, including the skin. Good sources of B vitamins include eggs, poultry, and fortified whole grains. Deficiencies in B vitamins trigger itching and dryness. When topically applied, B vitamins can help protect* against sun-induced skin damages and prevent formation of wrinkles, according to a Japanese study.

7. Lycopene

Lycopene refers to antioxidants extracted from tomatoes. Lycopene gives tomatoes their red color. Health benefits on the skin can be obtained by consuming freshly warmed tomatoes or using tomato facials. Other than fighting free radicals, when applied topically, lycopene helps in metabolic functions related to cell growth and repair. In addition, lycopene have UV-blocking capabilities making it an important weapon in the fight against aging skin. Other sources of lycopene include papaya, wolfberry, goji and pink grapefruit.

Weighing Claims* on Antioxidants

There are several cosmetic products in the market today whose manufacturers are making weird claims* about their efficiency in alleviating skin problems. You should never fall prey to such claims* and hype. Even though natural ingredients in dietary supplements and cosmetic products have undergone clinical tests and proven* to be safe, some of their benefits on the skin have not been scientifically proven*. Products may claim* to be rich in essential antioxidants like vitamin C or E, it is hard to know how much of each ingredients are in a formula. For them to remain stable and effective, vitamin or antioxidant should be in higher concentrations. It is thus advisable to consult a dermatologist before purchasing cosmetic products or supplements for your skin.

Conclusion

By taking a closer look at skin care vitamins and antioxidants, you will find that almost all come from plant sources. You can reap many skin health benefits from vitamins and antioxidants either through topical application or incorporating them in your diet. However, heat denatures vitamins as well as antioxidants, thus they are more beneficial when freshly used. Vitamins and antioxidants have significant impacts in alleviating common skin conditions caused by exposure to sunlight. Remember to regularly use sunscreen protection to improve* the health of your skin.

Have you ever had these Amazing Antioxidants for Flawless Skin!! What were the Results? Share with us!

References

  • http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/biof.5520090238/abstract
  • http://jn.nutrition.org/content/136/6/1565.full
  • http://www.jdsjournal.com/article/S0923-1811(11)00358-6/abstract

Take Action: Support Consumer Health Digest by linking to this article from your website

Permalink to this article:

Embed article link: (Click to copy HTML code below):

Reprinting this article:
Non-commercial use OK, cite ConsumerHealthDigest.com with clickable link.


 
 
Author

Expert Author : Elizabeth Lytle (Consumer Health Digest)

Elizabeth Lytle is a content writer and editor based in the United States. She works with The Site Gardener as copywriter, editor, project manager and marketing director. Connect with Beth on Facebook for constant updates on her projects.